LAB ALUMNI

Kelly Biedenweg
Assistant Professor, Fisheries and Wildlife Department, Oregon State University
Kelly Biedenweg

Kelly Biedenweg is an Assistant Professor of Human Dimensions at Oregon State University's Fisheries and Wildlife Department. Kelly was formerly a postdoctoral fellow at Stanford through the Natural Capital Project with an NSF Science, Education, and Engineering for Sustainability fellowship. Prior to that she was a fellow with Dr. Ardoin on the Moore Foundation-funded project on Innovative Metrics in Residential Field Science Programs. Her research interests are in environmental education and communication, social learning, natural resource management, and sociocultural values. Kelly has worked as a consultant for The Nature Conservancy, the U.S. Forest Service´s Pacific Northwest Research Station, the Institute for Culture and Ecology, TetraTech ARD, University of Washington, and King County. Kelly is a former NSF IGERT, American Association of University Women, and University of Florida Alumni fellow. Kelly received her PhD in 2010 from the University of Florida School of Forest Resources and Conservation with a certificate in Environmental Education and Communication and Latin American Studies, and a concentration in Tropical Conservation and Development. She holds a master of science in conservation biology and a bachelor of science in marine ecology. Her website is www.kellybiedenweg.com.

Matt Biggar
Strategy Consultant
Matt Biggar

Matt is a strategy consultant whose work focuses on social change and environmental issues. He received his PhD from Stanford’s Graduate School of Education, where his research focused on environmental learning and environmental behavior. Matt’s research on behavior change addressed both the barriers and supports that influence people’s ability to change behavior and develop new habits, with an emphasis on personal transportation behavior. His methods include interviews, focus groups, document analysis, and field observations. Matt has also conducted research on collective impact (a social change process) in the nonprofit sector. Prior to Stanford, Matt served as an administrator and classroom educator in Bay Area public school systems for 17 years. In these capacities, Matt led district- and school-level initiatives, including strategic planning.

Hilary Boudet
Assistant Professor, School of Public Policy, Oregon State University
Hilary Boudet

Hilary Boudet is an Assistant Professor of Climate Change and Energy in the School of Public Policy at Oregon State University. She was a Postdoctoral Scholar at the Stanford Prevention Research Center in the Stanford University School of Medicine, where she managed a community-based intervention with 30 Northern California Junior Girl Scout troops aimed at reducing household energy use. Her research interests include environmental and energy policy, social movements, and public participation in energy and environmental decision making. In 2010, she completed her dissertation in Stanford’s Emmett Interdisciplinary Program in Environment and Resources on the factors and processes shaping community mobilization around proposals for liquefied natural gas facilities. Prior to Stanford, Hilary worked for three years as a senior project engineer in the environment and regulatory group at the ExxonMobil Development Company. She holds a BA in Environmental Engineering and Political Science from Rice University.

K.C. Busch
Assistant Professor, STEM Education, North Carolina State University
K.C. Busch

K.C.’s research serves as a counter-narrative to the science education literature’s concentration on what students do not know about climate change; by contrast, she focuses on empowering and hopeful messages around what students can do to address his pressing and growing issue. Drawing on research from the fields of communication and environmental psychology, K.C. has investigated the language used to teach about climate change in formal educational settings, analyzing the language used in student textbooks and by teachers as they lecture about climate change. She has, for example, experimentally tested the effects of language choices on students’ understanding, attitudes, and action. K.C.’s research mission is to explore and advance educational experiences that empower students of science to improve their lives and their communities. K.C. is currently an assistant professor in the Leadership in Public Science faculty cluster at NC State University. Previously, she worked as a postdoctoral fellow with the Stanford Center for Language, Assessment, and Equity (SCALE). She holds a Ph.D. in science education from Stanford University and an M.A. from the University of Texas in Austin. After completing a B.S. in ecology from Iowa State University, she taught secondary school science in Austin, Texas for 12 years; she also has 2 years of informal environmental education experience in Africa with the Peace Corps and in Nevada with the National Park Service.

Kathleen "Susie" Claxton
Stanford R&DE, Student Housing
Kathleen "Susie" Claxton

Susie is a Health, Safety, and Environmental Compliance Program Manager who works at Stanford in R&DE Student Housing and previously for the School of Engineering. Before coming to Stanford, Susie worked in occupational and environmental health research at SRI, International and the California Public Health Foundation. Susie graduated with a B.S. Degree in Environmental Studies from The George Washington University, and holds an M.A. in Environmental Planning from the California Consortium of State Universities. Susie's focus at work is on environmental and occupational health, and wellness.  Susie is interested in Environmental Education and how it affects environmental ethics and behaviors. She has volunteered in a variety of community environmental projects, and recently volunteered supporting fieldwork on the project: Facilitating Pro-Environmental Behavior: Leveraging Nature-based Tourism into Everyday Stewardship, funded by the Woods Institute Environmental Ventures Project seed grant program.

Marilyn Cornelius
Founder, Alchemus Prime
Marilyn Cornelius

Marilyn is co-founder of Alcheums Prime, a new venture that focuses on problem-solving at the nexus of climate change, wellness, and education. In 2013, she completed her dissertation in the Emmett Interdisciplinary Program in Environment and Resources (E-IPER) at Stanford, where she specialized in applying behavioral sciences and design thinking to energy use reduction. Marilyn assisted late climatologist and advisor Professor Stephen Schneider with multiple climate-related projects at Stanford before commencing her doctoral studies. Prior to graduate school, as Environment Associate for the United Nations Development Program, Marilyn managed projects in 10 Pacific Island nations focusing on climate change, energy, land degradation, and biodiversity. Marilyn holds a Bachelor of Science with a focus on Environmental Resource Management from Menlo College.

Amanda Cravens
USGS Mendenhall Postdoctoral Research Fellow
Amanda Cravens

Amanda´s research interests sit at the intersection of conflict resolution, learning sciences, and information technology design. Her dissertation focused on MarineMap—a software tool implemented during the process of negotiating California’s Marine Protected Life Act. In this study, Amanda considered methods for evaluating MarineMap, and similar software, in ways that help groups collectively think, learn, and make environmental decisions in complex and often contentious public policy settings such as marine planning or federal lands management. She is also part of the Research as Design project, which is investigating the role of creativity in scholarly work and exploring how design thinking training can empower emerging scholars. She received a PhD from Stanford’s Emmett Interdisciplinary Program on Environment and Resources, an MA from the University of Canterbury in New Zealand, and a BA from Swarthmore College.

Rebecah Davis
Rebecah Davis

Rebecah completed her Ph.D. in Science Education in the Graduate School of Education, where her research interests focused on public understanding of complex environmental topics, curriculum development for environmental education in formal and informal settings, and behavior change. Her dissertation investigated the relationship between mental models of climate change and related attitudes and behaviors. Before coming to Stanford, Rebecah worked for seven years as a middle school and high school science teacher in Berkeley; she has also helped develop science curriculum for the USGS, UCMP, and the Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment. She earned her B.S. in plant molecular and cell biology from Brigham Young University. In her free time, Rebecah enjoys exploring San Francisco with her partner and twin sons, cycling, yoga, and restoring her turn-of-the-century Edwardian home.

Maria DiGiano
Project Scientist, Earth Innovation Institute
Maria DiGiano

Maria is a Project Scientist with the Earth Innovation Institute. She also works as a research associate on our Innovative Metrics in Field Science Education initiatives. Her research focus on community-based natural resource management, land tenure, and perceptions of rights and resources. Maria earned her PhD in Interdisciplinary Ecology, with a concentration in Anthropology and Tropical Conservation and Development, from the University of Florida in 2010. She is a former NSF IGERT, Inter-American Grassroots Development, and American Association of University Women fellow. Maria has conducted research in Ecuador, Brazil, and Mexico, and served as a U.S. Peace Corps volunteer in Paraguay. She holds an M.S. in Interdisciplinary Ecology from the University of Florida and a B.A. in History from the University of North Carolina.
 

Priya Fielding-Singh
Department of Sociology
Priya Fielding-Singh

Priya Fielding-Singh is a 3rd year Ph.D. student in Sociology, studying the U.S. food and environmental movements. Her research falls into two central projects: first, Priya looks at student mobilization around these issues and investigates how today’s young adults are recruited into activism. Second, she studies how people learn about food and environmental injustices, and under what circumstances that learning leads them to make changes in their daily lives. Priya’s thinking on these topics has been informed by a number of hands-on experiences – from working in food pantries and teaching cooking classes to conducting behavorial interventions. She serves as Co-Director of the Slow Food Childhood Obesity Bay Area Conference as well as the founder and co-chair of the Stanford Food Forum, a student group aimed at facilitating interdisciplinary dialogue around food systems issues. Priya hopes that her work will help identify solutions for transforming our current, shockingly inequitable food system.

Alice Fu
Research Consultant
Alice Fu

Alice Fu managed the first year of the Ardoin Social Ecology Lab’s engagement with the ee360 project, a US EPA-funded initiative focused on innovative approaches to connecting environmental research with practice and policy. Previously, Alice worked with SK Partners, LLC, an education consulting group based in Menlo Park, CA. There, she focused on high-quality assessments and evaluations in informal science education, funded by the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation. She completed her PhD in science education at Stanford's Graduate School of Education. For her dissertation research, Alice conducted multiple case studies of how educators at informal science institutions design and develop field trip programs for schools; she used a model of knowledge-brokering to explore the types of knowledge and resources the educators use in their work. Prior to her PhD, Alice worked at WestEd as Science Specialist on the development of the science framework and test specifications for the 2009 National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP). Alice has a Bachelor’s degree in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology from Princeton University and a Master’s degree in Curriculum and Teacher Education from Stanford. Her research interests include assessment, informal science and environmental education, and relationships between schools and informal science institutions.

Rachelle Gould
Assistant Professor, Environmental Program, University of Vermont
Rachelle Gould
Rachelle is an assistant professor in the Environmental Program at the University of Vermont. Her previous position was as a postdoctoral scholar managing the Environmental Learning in the San Francisco Bay Area project. Rachelle is an interdisciplinary scholar whose work involves social science, ecology, and the humanities. Her research interest centers on the relationship—particularly the intangible relationship—between people and ecosystems. Her dissertation focused on ecological restoration and Cultural Ecosystem Services in forests of Kona, Hawaii. Ecological restoration, as a human action, makes obvious the normative nature of much conservation action; for her PhD work, Rachelle combined ecological study of restoration with study of the Cultural Ecosystem Services (intangible benefits from nature, such as spirituality and heritage) related to her study system. Rachelle has a Master’s in Forest Science from the Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies and a PhD from Stanford University’s Emmett Interdisciplinary Program on Environment and Resources.
Nicole Holthuis
Research Associate, SCALE, Stanford Graduate School of Education
Nicole Holthuis

Nicole is a Research Associate at the Stanford Center for Assessment, Learning, and Equity. She specializes in research, curriculum and assessment design, and evaluation in science and environmental education. Her work focuses on developing programs that seek to improve the educational experience and outcomes of students who are traditionally under-represented in science and engineering. She has experience teaching high school science, designing and evaluating curriculum, leading educator workshops, and providing solutions for teachers, schools, and institutions. Nicole has a PhD in Curriculum and Teacher Education (specializing in science education) and a MA in Design and Evaluation of Educational Programs, both from Stanford University. She also holds a BA in Biology from UC Davis and a California Secondary School Science Credential.

Carter Hunt
Assistant Professor of Recreation, Park, and Tourism Management, Pennsylvania State University
Carter Hunt

Carter Hunt is an Assistant Professor of Recreation, Park, and Tourism Management at Pennsylvania State University. His professional interests focus on improving tourism’s capacity to support biodiversity conservation and sustainable community development. From 2009 to 2012 he was a Postdoctoral Fellow in Stanford’s Department of Anthropology and the Woods Institute for the Environment. During that time, he was also affiliated with the Center for Responsible Travel (CREST) office at Stanford. From Penn State, he continues to collaborate on the Woods Institute’s Osa-Golfito Initiative, a project focusing on sustainable development in southwestern Costa Rica. He also continues to work alongside Professor Ardoin and Postdoctoral Scholar Mele Wheaton on their Environmental Ventures Project Facilitating Pro-Environmental Behavior: Leveraging Nature-Based Tourism into Everyday Stewardship. Carter earned his Ph.D. and M.S. in the Recreation, Park, and Tourism Sciences Program at Texas A&M University and holds a B.A. in Psychology from the University of Kentucky.

Kathayoon Khalil
Principal Evaluator, Seattle Aquarium
Kathayoon Khalil

Kathayoon graduated from the Curriculum and Teacher Education (CTE) and Learning Sciences and Technology Design (LSTD) programs at Stanford¹s School of Education in 2014. Her interests are in the evaluation of learner experiences in informal learning facilities such as zoos and aquariums and her dissertation is entitled, "Social Learning Systems in Zoo and Aquarium Education: Networks and communities of practice." Before coming to Stanford, Kathayoon completed a BA in Organismal Biology and Literature from Claremont McKenna College, and a Master of Environmental Science degree from the Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies. Kathayoon is now the Principal Evaluator at the Seattle Aquarium.

Noa Kekuewa Lincoln
Assistant Professor, University of Hawaii
Noa Kekuewa Lincoln

Born and raised in Hawai’i, Noa’s research interests include the co-evolution of social practice and landscapes and the intersection of environmental and human ecology. His dissertation work in south Kona, Hawaii, involved investigating nutrient cycles in indigenous agricultural systems, an analysis of ecosystem services of different modern agricultural systems, and understanding layers of values in agricultural management regimes. An experienced professional in Pacific Ocean ecosystem restoration, land-use decision making, policy development and community education, Noa is also an author and the co-founder of two nonprofit organizations. While at Stanford, Noa received the Stanford Excellence in Mentoring Award for his service and mentorship to minority and at-risk youths and undergraduates. In 2013, Noa received his Ph.D. from the Emmett Interdisciplinary Program in Environment and Resources at Stanford; he then completed a postdoctoral research fellowship at the University of Canterbury in Christchurch, New Zealand. He is currently an assistant professor of indigenous crops and cropping systems at the University of Hawaii.

Megan Luce
Research Associate
Megan Luce

Megan is a developmental psychologist and educator who designs science learning experiences for families with young children, and studies how families make sense of phenomena together.  Her research is focused on out-of-school settings such as children’s museums, family science nights at elementary schools, outdoor spaces (beaches and parks), and families’ homes. Her design work has focused on collaborative inquiry-based activities that families can do “anytime, anywhere,” which includes a mobile app called Playful Science. Motivating Megan’s research and learning design efforts are the goals of broadening what counts as science learning and inviting families to see themselves as capable of learning and doing science. Megan studies family learning as an important context of science education in its own right, but also seeks to understand how family learning connects with school-based learning. She has a PhD in psychology from UC Santa Cruz.

Heather Lukacs
Project Director, Community Water Center
Heather Lukacs

Heather’s research focuses on community-based natural resource management and how to better conduct research with, and for, underserved rural communities. She conducted work both internationally and domestically, including a study investigating the sustainability of rural water supply systems in Bolivia. Heather’s dissertation focused on factors associated with participation in grassroots community groups working to restore and protect rivers and streams in Appalachia. Specifically, she considered the relationships between the extent and form of an individual’s watershed group participation and his or her sense of place, perceived self-efficacy, and watershed group efficacy. While at Stanford, Heather received the Centennial Teaching Assistant Award for outstanding teaching. Heather holds a bachelor’s and master’s degrees in environmental engineering from MIT. She completed her Ph.D. in the Emmett Interdisciplinary Program in Environment and Resources (E-IPER) in 2014.

 

Claire Menke
User Research and Community Manager, Versal.com
Claire Menke

Claire Menke is the User Research and Community Manager for Versal.com, an online publishing platform created to house educational content. She previously worked as a Social Science Researcher in Stanford's Department of Anthropology and the Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment. Throughout her studies, her academic and research pursuits have focused on finding a viable intersection between economic development and conservation, primarily in Latin America. In 2011, Claire received and M.S. in Earth Systems from Stanford, with a concentration on the political economy of sustainable development and conservation. Her undergraduate honors thesis for Stanford's Department of Anthropology and the Goldman Honors Program in Environmental Science, Technology and Policy focused on the effect of tour group composition on animal behavior during Peruvian Amazon eco-tours. More recent intellectual pursuits are focused on determining the long-term viability of education technology as a means to effectively globalize education.

Becky Niemiec
Assistant Professor, Human Dimensions of Natural Resources, Colorado State University
Becky Niemiec

Rebecca “Becky” Niemiec  is an Assistant Professor in the Human Dimensions of Natural Resources Department at Colorado State University. She has a PhD from the Emmett Interdisciplinary Program in Environment and Resources, Department of Earth, Energy, and Environmental Sciences, Stanford University. Her research focuses on understanding and promoting community engagement in conservation efforts, particularly on private lands. Her dissertation work examined how to motivate landowner collective action to control invasive species across property boundaries in Hawaii and New Zealand. Becky applies mixed methods, including surveys, interviews, spatial analysis, and field experiments, to examine the factors driving community conservation action and the impact of community actions on conservation outcomes. Becky is passionate about working collaboratively with conservation practitioners in both her research and teaching; she has taught community-engaged learning courses on topics ranging from open space management to conservation psychology.

Fiona Noonan
Earth Systems
Fiona Noonan

Fiona is a senior and co-terminal masters student in Earth Systems. She is interested in the social dimensions of land use and conservation in the American West, including components of political ecology, environmental education, and natural resource management. She has worked with the Ardoin Lab on studying social dynamics of immersive environmental education experiences in Yosemite National Park, and will help conduct research on people's perceptions, attitudes, and behaviors related to climate change in redwood forests during the summer of 2017. In addition to school, she currently works as an environmental educator with Stanford Outdoor Education, and will be an apprentice educator at the High Mountain Institute in Leadville, CO in 2018.

Lauren Oakes **
Conservation Scientist, Wildlife Conservation Society
Lauren Oakes

Lauren’s research focuses on adaptation to climate change, drawing from the social and ecological sciences. She studies ecological impacts of climate change and how people respond to impacts occurring in order to inform conservation and management strategies in a changing climate. At the core of her passions for research, teaching, and creatively communicating issues of environmental change is the desire to understand human-environment interactions critical to improving resource management and conservation practices. She has written about her research in numerous venues, including her recently completed first book, The Canary Tree, as well as in outlets such asThe New York Times Green blog. Lauren completed her PhD at Stanford in the Emmett Interdisciplinary Program in Environment and Resources and has a B.A. degree from Brown University in Environmental Studies (Honors) and Visual Art. While at Stanford, Lauren received a National Science Graduate Student Research Fellowship and the Lieberman Fellowship for outstanding scholarship, teaching, and university service. Prior to joining WCS, Lauren worked as a Visiting Scholar in Environmental Science Writing in the Earth Systems Program; a research associate with the Social Ecology lab; and a lecturer in the Program in Writing and Rhetoric, all at Stanford University.

Shannon Randolph
Associate Director, Sontag Center for Collaborative Creativity, Claremont College
Shannon Randolph

Shannon is the Director of Community and Global Engagement at the Rick and Susan Sontag Center for Collaborative Creativity, also known as “The Hive,” at Claremont College. She was previously a postdoctoral researcher in conservation education, evaluation, and community engagement at the San Diego Zoo, building on her PhD work in the Evolution and Ecology track in Stanford's Anthropology department. Her scholarship focuses on human-environment relations and the impact of human-animal interactions on infectious disease outbreaks. Her dissertation research explored the roles of social capital and rural-to-urban migration as drivers of urban demand for wild meat in Cameroon. Shannon has worked in Africa since 2000 on various projects exploring the bushmeat trade, political ecology of indigenous land and natural resource rights in coastal Kenya, human perceptions of medicine and natural resources in Zambia, Uganda and Cameroon and the feasibility of payment for ecosystem services projects in Central Africa.

Dan Reineman
Assistant Professor, CSU Channel Islands
Dan Reineman

Dan is an assistant professor of at environmental science and resource management at CSU Channel Islands. Previously, he directed the Educational Initiatives Team at Stanford’s School of Earth, Energy, and Environmental Sciences (SE3). In that role, he focused on developing new, innovative undergraduate courses for SE3. He also taught in SE3’s Wrigley Program in Hawai’i, for which he received the university’s Gores Award for excellence in teaching. Dan completed his PhD in environment and resources at Stanford in 2015, with a dissertation titled, “The human dimensions of wave resource management in California.” This research explored the value and vulnerability of waves in California by combing social, natural, and citizen science. He received his BS in marine biology at UCLA and his MS in oceanography at the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa. He worked on ocean and coastal policy in Washington DC as a Knauss Fellow with Congressman Sam Farr before coming to Stanford. He worked as a postdoctoral fellow at the at the Bill Lane Center for the American West, where he studied the implications of environmental change and coastal management on coastal resources and access. Dan has spent much of his life in, on, or under the water, beginning with his childhood in San Diego, CA. Perhaps not surprisingly, his favorite color is blue.

Diego Román
Assistant Professor, Southern Methodist University
Diego Román

Diego Román is an assistant professor in the Simmons School of Education and Human Development at Southern Methodist University. In 2014, he received a PhD in Educational Linguistics from the Stanford Graduate School of Education. He also has a M.Sc. in Biology from Stanford, an M.Sc. in Curriculum and Instruction from the University of Wisconsin-Whitewater, and a B.S. in Sustainable Agriculture from Zamorano University in Honduras. An experienced teacher and teacher educator, Diego holds science teaching credentials from Wisconsin and California, in addition to ESL and BCLAD certificates from these two states. At the international level, he has also worked with students and teachers in a variety of science and education projects, including current work in the Galapagos Islands trying to connect science and bilingual education with environmental protection. For his dissertation, Diego studied the linguistic and multimodal characteristics of science texts used at the middle-school level in California, with a special focus on the language used to discuss environmental issues.

Nik Sawe
Lecturer, Emmett Interdisciplinary Program in Environment and Resources Research Associate, Precourt Energy Efficiency Center
Nik Sawe

​Nik uses a combination of neuroimaging, behavioral experiments, and econometric surveys to understand why we make the environmental choices we do. Presently, his work focuses on how we value the environment, what motivates environmental philanthropy, and consumer decision-making involving energy efficiency and eco-labeling. He is a research associate at the Precourt Energy Efficiency Center and a lecturer in Stanford's E-IPER program, where he teaches courses on Environmental Decision-Making and Risk Perception and Environmental Governance. Nik is a past fellow at the Stanford Center for Ethics in Society, the Haas Center for Public Service, and the Center for Philanthropy and Civil Society. He earned a Ph.D. in Environment and Resources and a B.S. in Biology from Stanford University.

Janel Schuh
Research Associate, Fors Marsh Group
Janel Schuh

Janel Schuh is a Research Associate (and former Postdoctoral Scholar) on the Environmental Learning in the San Francisco Bay Area project of the Ardoin Social Ecology Lab. She has worked for more than a dozen years as a survey research professional in the academic, government, nonprofit, and for-profit sectors. Her primary research interest is in exploring how interpersonal communication and media can be used to promote prosocial change. Janel’s PhD is in Communication from the USC Annenberg School for Communication & Journalism and her dissertation research focused on the social functions of celebrity gossip among high school girls. She holds an MA in Journalism & Mass Communication from UNC-Chapel Hill and a BA in Mass Communication from James Madison University.

Carly Sponarski
Assistant Professor, Department of Wildlife, Fisheries, and Conservation Biology, University of Maine
Carly Sponarski

Carly is an assistant professor at the University of Maine, where her research focuses on human dimensions of natural resources; specifically, she is interested in the relationships between people, the environment, and resources. Previously, Carly was a postdoctoral fellow with Stanford’s Social Ecology Lab, where she worked on the “Environmental Learning in the Bay Area,” “Blue Habits” whale watching, and “Community Conservation in Watsonville” projects. Carly earned a PhD from Memorial University of Newfoundland in Protected Areas and Natural Resource Management. Her dissertation research emphasized human attitudes toward coyotes and coyote management and aspects of human-coyote conflicts in a national park. The findings from her initial study helped develop an experiential education program called “Sharing Spaces: Living with Coyotes” targeted at reducing perceptions of risk perception toward coyotes. Carly also has a Master’s in Environmental Design with a specialization in environmental sciences from the University of Calgary.

Tanja Srebotnjak
Visiting Scholar
Tanja Srebotnjak

Dr. Tanja Srebotnjak is the inaugural director of the Hixon Center for Sustainable Environmental Design at Harvey Mudd College. Her research interests focus on the development and application of statistical methods for describing and analyzing a range of environmental issues, including the environmental and health risks associated with oil and gas development in California, the spatial analysis of ecosystem service hotspots, mapping sustainability networks, and designing effective urban green infrastructure. Trained as a statistician, she began her professional career at the United Nations Statistics Division in New York where she developed indicators and methods for official environmental statistics and later completed her doctoral research in environmental statistics and policy at the Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies in 2007. Prior to coming to Harvey Mudd College, Srebotnjak worked for the German environmental think tank Ecologic Institute and the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC). She also serves as associate editor for Environmetrics and Population Health Metrics. She was a visiting scholar with Prof. Ardoin’s Social Ecology Lab in the 2017-18 academic year.

Aaron Strong
Assistant Professor, Marine Policy, University of Maine
Aaron Strong

Aaron Strong is an assistant professor of marine policy in the School of Marine Sciences at the University of Maine. He studies decision-making related to nascent institutional approaches to the management of the carbon and nitrogen cycles; he also focuses on the role of local-scale conservation organizations in enhancing carbon storage in ecosystems. Previously, Aaron was a research associate at MIT, and he worked as a scientific technician at the University of Montana and at the Marine Biological Laboratory in Woods Hole, Mass. Aaron holds a PhD in environment and resources from Stanford University; a master’s degree in environmental policy from the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University; and a bachelor’s degree in biology and political science from Swarthmore College.

Jennifer Thomsen
Assistant Professor, College of Forestry and Conservation, University of Montana
Jennifer Thomsen

Jenn is an assistant professor of nature-based tourism, sustainability, and recreation at the University of Montana. She was formerly a postdoctoral scholar on the Environmental Learning in the San Francisco Bay Area project. She earned her Ph.D. from Clemson University in Parks, Recreation, and Tourism Management, where her research focused on landscape-scale conservation addressing transboundary social and ecological issues. Jenn’s dissertation explored the opportunities and challenges throughout the lifecycle of landscape-scale collaborative conservation organizations with case studies on the Southern Appalachian Man and the Biosphere Cooperative (SAMAB) located in the southeastern region of the U.S. and the Crown Managers Partnership (CMP) located in the northwestern region that crosses the Canadian-U.S. border. Jenn has also participated in numerous projects with the National Park Service including co-authoring the Healthy Parks, Healthy People Science Plan and projects on education and interpretation in protected areas. In addition, she has conducted research and implemented projects pertaining to tourism and conservation in Namibia, the Dominican Republic, and Peru. Jenn’s B.S. and M.S. degrees were in Wildlife and Fisheries Biology from Clemson University.

Nicola Ulibarri
Assistant Professor, Environmental Planning, University of California, Irvine
Nicola Ulibarri

Nicola Ulibarri is an Assistant Professor in Environmental Planning at the University of California, Irvine. Previously, she was a postdoctoral Scholar in the Bill Lane Center for the American West at Stanford University. Her research uses political, social, and technical perspectives to evaluate the sustainability of environmental planning and decision-making practices, with a focus on collaborative governance and water resources management. She earned her PhD in the Emmett Interdisciplinary Program in Environment and Resources, where she was a David & Lucille Packard Foundation Stanford Graduate Fellow in Science & Engineering and a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellow. Born and raised in northern New Mexico, Nicola's professional life has spanned the public and nonprofit sectors, including work with the U.S. Department of the Interior, the World Bank, and Amigos Bravos, a grassroots river-protection nonprofit in New Mexico.

Jen Wang
Emmett Interdisciplinary Program on Environment and Resources
Jen Wang

Jen Wang completed her Ph.D. in Environment and Resources through the Emmett Interdisciplinary Program in Environment and Resources (E-IPER). Her dissertation research focused on attitudes and decision-making related to prosocial behaviors and common goods, particularly those in the environmental and health domains. Using quantitative and qualitative approaches, her projects considered business attitudes toward environmental sustainability and climate change, variation in teens’ food choices by socio-economic status and family food practices, and consumer attitudes and perceptions of “green” products and environmental violations. In addition to her graduate-school research, Jen has worked with a number of organizations such as the Natural Resource Defense Council and the UK Behavioral Insights Team to conduct policy-relevant research. While at Stanford, she co-founded the Stanford Environment Behavior (SEB) student group. She holds a B.S. from Yale University in Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology.

Deborah Wojcik
Associate Director for Counseling, Training, and Programs, Nicholas School for the Environment, Duke University
Deborah Wojcik

Deb is the associate director for Counseling, Training, and Programs in the Career Services Office of Duke’s Nicholas School for the Environment. Formerly, Deb was the associate director of the Emmett Interdisciplinary Program on Environment and Resources (EIPER) at Stanford and, prior to that, a postdoctoral scholar who helped launch Prof. Ardoin’s Environmental Learning in the San Francisco Bay Area project. Deb’s research interests focus on informal environmental education and communication, community-based natural resource management, social network analysis, and mental models and perceptions. Deb was an NSF-IGERT fellow and completed her PhD in 2011 in the School of Forest Resources and Conservation at the University of Florida with a certificate in Environmental Education and Communications and a concentration in Tropical Conservation and Development. Her dissertation investigated communication and social networks associated with water and wildlife resources in rural Botswana. Deb holds a masters of environmental management, master of arts in teaching, and bachelor of science degrees from Duke University.

Noelle Wyman Roth
Associate in Research, Nicholas School of the Environment, Duke University
Noelle Wyman Roth

Noelle is an associate in research at Duke’s Nicholas School of the Environment. Previously, she was a Research Specialist at QSR International, the company that makes NVivo, a qualitative data analysis software; and prior to that, she was the Social Ecology lab manager. Noelle specializes in qualitative research and data analysis. Noelle has also worked for the Superfund Research Center’s Research Translation Core at Duke University, where her work centered on communicating environmental science to broader audiences and affected communities. She earned a B.A. in Political Science from Boston College and a Masters of Environmental Management from Duke. 

lab alumni

Mehana Blaich Vaughan
Emmett Interdisciplinary Program in Environment and Resources
Mehana Blaich Vaughan

Mehana Blaich Vaughan is an assistant professor in the Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Management at the University of Hawai’i at Mānoa. Her research interests include collaborative and community based resource governance; indigenous ecological knowledge; place-based education; common property rights; and approaches to enhance collaboration, learning, and dialogue in decision-making surrounding natural resources. Mehana completed her PhD in the Emmett Interdisciplinary Program in Environment and Resources (EIPER) at Stanford University in 2012. Her dissertation focused on collaborative management of a Hawaiian coastal fishery by government agencies and community members. At the University of Hawai’i, Mehana works with a consortium of scholars—from Sea Grant, Hawaiian Studies and Law—who focus on cross-disciplinary solutions to natural and cultural resource management, sustainability, and food security issues. She is also investigating changing patterns of access to natural resources in Hawai’i through an NSF Science, Engineering and Education for Sustainability (SEES) postdoctoral fellowship.  Mehana grew up in the rural Halele’a district on the island of Kaua’i. Prior to pursuing a doctoral degree, she taught middle and high school, developing place-based education programs for Hawaiian immersion and charter schools. She has three children and is grateful to her ‘ohana (family) and the many friends, teachers, students, kūpuna (elders) and Hawai’i communities that have supported, guided, and informed her work.